The view of the Arctic Corsair from the bottom of the dock at the North End Shipyard.
The view of the Arctic Corsair from the bottom of the dock at the North End Shipyard.

Stunning pictures show plans for Hull’s huge maritime project

These amazing pictures reveal plans that will lead to the transformation of Hull’s most important maritime treasures.

The ambitious plans, which will lead to the regeneration of the Arctic Corsair, North End Shipyard, Spurn Lightship, Dock Office Chambers and the Hull Maritime Museum, go on public display at Hull’s Trinity Market today – with Hull City Council asking for public feedback.

The project will create an exciting new maritime route that will guide visitors through the heart of the city from Queen Victoria Square to the River Hull.

A sketch of how the North End Shipyard may look once the Arctic Corsair has been dry-docked and a new visitor centre built. The site will also be home to the last ‘Scotch Derrick’ crane in Hull.

A sketch of how the North End Shipyard may look once the Arctic Corsair has been dry-docked and a new visitor centre built. The site will also be home to the last ‘Scotch Derrick’ crane in Hull.

Jointly funded by the council and the National Lottery Heritage Fund – subject to a successful funding bid – the project will mark the start of a new chapter in the city’s journey as a culturally vibrant maritime city.

The ‘story so far’ exhibition will transport visitors to 2022 when the plans will have become a reality. Never-seen-before artists’ and architects’ drawings and computer generated visuals will show how Hull’s outstanding maritime heritage will be protected, preserved and celebrated for generations to come.

If Hull succeeds in securing £13.6m of National Lottery Heritage Fund funding, work to create the major new attraction will begin later this year, delivering a major boost to the plans to build a lasting and sustainable legacy from Hull’s year as UK City of Culture.

The redesign of the Wharfage room gallery at the Hull Maritime Museum.

The redesign of the Wharfage room gallery at the Hull Maritime Museum.

Trinity Market will be the first of seven locations across the city to host the travelling roadshow, offering the public the opportunity to see how the restored Arctic Corsair will look in a permanent home to become a new, must-see visitor attraction in a former dock at the North End Shipyard, as well as exciting, transformational plans for the Hull Maritime Museum, making a museum for the future.

Mark Jones MBE, Hull City Council’s Director of Regeneration, said: “These plans show the continuing ambition of the council and its partners to cement Hull into a world-class visitor destination by making the most of its remarkable heritage as an international maritime city.

“As with our year as UK City of Culture, our aim is to regenerate our city and to use culture and heritage to boost economic prosperity and improve people’s lives right across the city.

The Hull: Yorkshire Maritime City plans include better access to the historic Spurn Lightship.

The Hull: Yorkshire Maritime City plans include better access to the historic Spurn Lightship.

“Over the past year, more than 10,000 people have given their ideas and suggestions on how they would like to see their city’s maritime heritage brought to life for all to enjoy. Now, we’d like everyone in the city to give us their views on the detailed plans and to show their support as we prepare to submit our bid for the funding to ensure this exciting project becomes a reality.”

From today, the ‘Story so far’ exhibition will go on public display and the Hull: Yorkshire Maritime City team will be seeking further comments and feedback to develop the exciting plans further.

Hull City Council has committed £10m to the project and in May 2019, a round-two bid for a £13.6m grant will be submitted to the National Lottery Heritage Fund after successfully securing a £1.34m round-one development grant in June 2017. If successful, work could start in early 2020.

Get more information on Hull: Yorkshire’s Maritime City here.

The Walking on the sea bed, left, and the original Victorian architecture on show from the atrium at the Hull Maritime Museum.

The Walking on the sea bed, left, and the original Victorian architecture on show from the atrium at the Hull Maritime Museum.

This project alone will bring an additional £2.86m a year into the local economy and attract over 300,000 visitors into the city. Added to the greater offer this project continues the regeneration of the city through its culture and heritage.

Members of the public can view the plans and speak to council staff at Trinity Market every day from 10am to 3pm until Thursday 2 May.

The plans will also be on show from 10am to 3pm:

  • Friday 3 May to Thursday 9 May at Freedom Centre in Preston Road
  • Friday 10 May to Thursday 16 May at Edinburgh Street Community Centre in Woodcock Street
  • Friday 17 May to Thursday 23 May at Unity in Community in Endike Lane
  • Friday 24 May to Thursday 30 May at North Bransholme Community Centre (Phoenix Project) in Lothian Way
  • Monday 20 May to Thursday 30 May at Princes Quay Shopping Centre in the city centre
  • Friday 31 May to Wednesday 31 July at  Hull Maritime Museum in Queen Victoria Square

Follow Hull: Yorkshire’s Maritime City on Twitter, on Facebook and on Instagram. Get more details on the project here.

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