Hull Christmas tree 2019
Hull's Christmas tree this year is a whopping 52ft.

How the perfect Christmas tree was chosen for Hull city centre

Visitors to Hull city centre may be feeling more festive after a 52ft Norway spruce arrived in Queen Victoria Square.

At 6am on Friday, the conifer arrived in the square before a five-strong team lifted, pivoted and settled it into its plot, taking time to ensure it stands perfectly straight from every angle.

The evergreen, which is about 38 years old, made the 140-mile journey from Woods Christmas Tree Farm in Solihull. Farm staff are well-versed in adorning sites across the country, having supplied the Prime Minister at 10 Downing Street.

The sustainable farm is home to almost one million Christmas trees of various ages and sizes.

We visited the farm to find out more about where our tree heralds from and followed it on its journey to Hull:

Adam Sivell-Thompson, one of Hull City Council’s urban forestry officers, said: “A lot of work goes into selecting the right tree for our city centre.

“We select the specific tree based not only on its height, but on its fullness and distribution of branches, acceptability for transport and to ensure it looks good from all angles and that the lights can be hung as evenly as possible.

“We work closely with Woods, which was chosen as a true professional in the field working hard on sustainability in the industry.

“We are really happy with this year’s tree and hope residents enjoy having it as a city Christmas centrepiece.”

Hull's Christmas tree 2019 arrives in Queen Victoria Square

The giant tree arrives in Queen Victoria Square.

The Christmas tree’s lights will be switched on by the Lord Mayor at an event in Queen Victoria Square on Thursday 14 December.

Geoff Gilbert of Woods Farm Christmas Trees said: “A real tree is good for the environment. We grow trees on 500 acres of land with them ranging from a few years old up to 50 years old.

“It provides a lovely environment for wildlife and of course the trees are producing oxygen and taking carbon dioxide out.

“The trees are a renewable source, we just replant them, thin the trees out and let more grow, as opposed to artificial trees that are not beneficial to the environment.”

Weighing scales
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